Next Gen Consoles Hit The Shelves

With Sony’s PS4 out on 11/15 and Microsoft’s Xbox One just a week later, things are heat­ing up in the next gen­er­a­tion con­sole war giants. Xbox and PlaySta­tion, as of Novem­ber, have both sold more than 80million con­soles and have loyal fans to argue about which one they think is bet­ter. This Year will be a lit­tle dif­fer­ent in the launch of the con­soles in which both will be held in the same week. Back in 2005, Microsoft was alone in the launch of the Xbox 360 and start­ing price for the sys­tem was from $300 to $400 depend­ing on the model , whereas the PS3 start­ing price was $500/$600 and was launched a year later in 2006. This time around Xbox will be the higher priced con­sole start­ing at $499 com­pared to PlayStation’s $399.

Both con­soles will now offer Blu-ray play­ers, whereas in the pre­vi­ous gen­er­a­tions PlaySta­tion was the only one capa­ble of play­ing Blu-ray disks. Both con­soles will also require you to buy an annual sub­scrip­tion to play online, some­thing very dif­fer­ent for PlaySta­tion 3 used to be free to play online. The biggest change to online play in both sys­tems, how­ever, will be the ded­i­cated servers (a smoother online expe­ri­ence with less con­ges­tion in sig­nal and fewer con­nec­tion time­outs) with Xbox one said to have more titles than PS4 in which ded­i­cated servers will be used.
Con­trollers for both con­soles will also be changed, for Xbox, the con­troller will ulti­mately only receive minor changes despite Microsoft’s $100 mil­lion dol­lar bud­get for con­troller design. The ana­logue sticks are slightly smaller, with a reduced dead-zone and a soft rub­ber thim­ble around the base for extra grip. The con­trol also is bet­ter on bat­tery life rum­ble motors down to about one eighth of their pre­vi­ous size but in more spe­cial­ized loca­tions through­out. Microsoft stated, “They said redesign­ing was a crazy idea, they asked how we could even think about touch­ing some­thing that is best-in-class. It’s already the world’s best game controller.”

PlayStation’s newest con­troller on the other hand had more dras­tic changes than the pre­vi­ous Dual­shock 3 con­troller. Dual­shock 4 con­troller will have changes from the con­tour and shape as well as new tech­nol­ogy. Some changes are its light sen­sor at the front of the con­troller, this sen­sor keeps track of who is who in the room and if some­one hands the con­troller off to another per­son, the con­troller rec­og­nizes that and switches the screen to adjust the player change so you don’t have to manually.

Other changes from the joy­sticks being eas­ier to grip, to the trig­ger and aim but­tons at the top of the con­troller (R1/R2 and L1/L2 but­tons) will no longer be a 90 degree climb on top of the con­troller, instead the con­troller will have a more cir­cu­lar feel to it, sim­i­lar Xbox’s 360 cur­rent con­troller. There is also a touch­pad and a speaker on the con­troller as well so you can hear the bul­lets through the con­troller.
Both sys­tems have their own exclu­sive titles and menu inter­faces that are a per­sonal choice to users, but on Xbox one the social aspect may have a slight edge. Both con­soles allow you keep con­nected to through apps, but Xbox allows you to stay con­nected even when you are watch­ing reg­u­lar TV. If a friend were to send you a mes­sage through Xbox live to play a game, their mes­sage would appear on the cor­ner of your TV screen because Xbox One allows you to view updates using your TV sig­nal via an HDMI input.

PS4 still has an edge in stats at launch date. Call of Duty Ghosts devel­oper Infin­ity Ward says it will run at 1080p on the PS4 but only 720p on the Xbox. Con­sole own­ers can upscale to 1080p but it wouldn’t be as good as native 1080p. The dif­fer­ence in res­o­lu­tion isn’t going to be that notice­able… but the PS4 will always be sharper in pic­ture due to PS4′s GPU (Graph­ics Pro­cess­ing Unit) is on paper 50% more pow­er­ful than the Xbox One.

One last thing worth men­tion­ing though is both con­soles will be unable to play pre­vi­ous gen games. In the end both con­soles have their advan­tages and dis­ad­van­tages, which is good since not every­one wants the same things in a gam­ing con­sole. In any case you can’t go wrong with either con­sole since both offer fea­tures that go above and beyond that of the pre­vi­ous gen consoles.

Image cour­tesy of Scott Behling — The Stinger
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