Classy Collegian: Ramen reduction

We are liv­ing in a col­le­giate world and that brings to mind cer­tain things like dorms, inter­mural sports and espe­cially not hav­ing any money for food. How can we here on the UW-S cam­pus be able to enjoy fancy meals at a low cost or even take the meals we usu­ally eat and enhance them to the level of mak­ing more than part time wages? That is the adven­ture I’ve taken upon myself, show­ing my fel­low stu­dents how to have a classy col­le­giate life. First would the bread and but­ter for stu­dents who cant afford bead and but­ter: Ramen noodles.

The idea of buy­ing a fill­ing bag of noo­dles that costs under a dol­lar is very appeal­ing and we all fall prey to the allur­ing sim­plic­ity of the meal, but those kind of noo­dles are cheap for a rea­son and health wise may as well be made out of the bag they are con­tained in and then doused with a help­ing of salt. How­ever there exist many alter­na­tive meth­ods of get­ting a reg­u­lar intake of noo­dles and salt with­out hav­ing to sac­ri­fice one of your kid­neys to save money.

First,we have to break down Ramen for what it is, which is essen­tially just noo­dles, some veg­gies and bul­lion to make the broth or sea­son­ing for the noo­dles itself. When we break it down to those ele­ments we have the abil­ity to make our own Ramen equiv­a­lent and get to enjoy more por­tions and in some cases save money.

When we exam­ine the noo­dle con­tent we can have lit­er­ally more then 20 types of noo­dles we can work with and depend­ing on ones pre­fer we can even find whole grain or gluten free alter­na­tives, which is become a more pop­u­lar option with more peo­ple dis­cov­er­ing they have this allergy.

Also, we have the abil­ity to diver­sify the amount and type of veg­gies we can incor­po­rate in our home­made Ramen. We can have a larger vari­ety and end up more  of a soup rather than a nod­dle mix. That is the impor­tant thing to remem­ber here is that Ramen is just a cheaper alter­na­tive to soup choice and the mix itself is so full of sodium and other  addi­tives you may or may not want inside your body.

Just remem­ber that just because some­thing is cheap doesn’t auto­mat­i­cally make it okay to put into your body and that most of time its just health­ier to make your own equiv­a­lent to things just like when moms and grand­mas make their own pop sick­les rather then buy­ing them from the store.

Image cour­tesy of Nate Han­ni­nen — The Stinger
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